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What is a `romantic piano concerto'? The question opens a Pandora's box of enquiry, and, as Hyperion reaches the seventy-sixth volume in its tirelessly ongoing series, I am tempted to offer an answer. Seemingly strict and precise musical categories (classical, romantic, modern, etc) can be misleading, made more for convenience than accuracy. Classical music can contain romantic elements and vice versa. Again, if by `romantic piano concerto' you imply something narrow and prescriptive then you ignore a richl

More generally, the romantic piano concerto is associated with ear-tickling bravura and outsize technical demands. Listeners to the piano concertos of, say, Hummel and Scharwenka expected the musical equivalent of a trapeze act, of triple somersaults without a safety net, of demands that can only be met by the apparently supernaturally gifted. They were much less impressed by the romantic piano concertos of Brahms, where the massive and daunting keyboard parts seemed more opaque than glittering and which be

No accusations of frivolity could be levelled at the romantic piano concertos of Joseph Rheinberger (1839-1901) and Bernhard Scholz (1835-1916), both of which offer an intriguing mix of elements. There is a sense, too, in both concertos of a longing to break from classical restraint and past conventions. Both composers led successful if unadventurous lives reflected in music more substantial than entertaining. Nonetheless Rheinberger was a musical prodigy composing three-part Masses with organ accompaniment

The abrupt opening, a clarion call to attention, promises music on the grand scale, haunted by memories of Beethoven's `Emperor' concerto with the soloist quickly expanding his entry in a whirl of events with double notes for added fullness and texture. Yet there is never a suggestion of the sort of writing that so delighted the audiences of so-called musical jewels. The second subject provides a suitably lyrical contrast and later you hear the influence of Schumann, notably his love of dotted rhythms. Agai

As its title declares, the second movement `adagio patetico' is more inward looking, though large-scale gestures make a rapid return. An intriguing mix of styles, the writing is again more full-blooded than decorative, before the clouds thicken and mark a final return to the sombre and `patetico' mood of the opening.

The finale `allegro energico' opens with leaping octaves, again suggesting grand ambitions before an `adagio molto' and a brief oasis of calm amid much hyperactivity. A `poco meno mosso' section blossoms lyrically while the final pages return us to the concerto's opening grandeur and an impressive close. The ghosts of Beethoven and Schumann may haunt the pages of this most opulent concerto, written on the grandest scale, but if it lacks memorable thematic material, its neglect seems incomprehensible when yo

Bernhard Scholz belonged to a musical circle that included Joachim, Clara Schumann and, more particularly, Brahms, whose influence is strongly felt throughout his work. Indeed, Scholz worked assiduously to promote Brahms and, in common with that composer, his chamber music is among the highlights of his output. The present recording is a reminder that there should be more opportunities for a rediscovery of his work.

Many of the characteristics of the Rheinberger concerto apply here, though Scholz is not without his own distinctive personality. The genial opening of his concerto leads to figuration, much of it reminiscent of Mendelssohn's lighter touch. Yet despite the appearance of octaves, double notes and skittering passage-work-enough to outwardly satisfy the virtuoso fancier-there is, again, more substance than levity. The gestures are more weighty than light-hearted and a bleaker note in the very Schumannesque ope

Finally, as a makeweight or encore, the Capriccio for piano and orchestra, Op 35. The pianist's opening arpeggiated chords are close to Mendelssohn's Capriccio brillant, also for piano and orchestra, before an acceleration into liveliness and confirmation of the music's title. The bouncing principal idea-something to set heads nodding and feet tapping-offers much to delight and nothing to offend. With a fleeting octave figure suggesting a mock-oriental touch and a strange prophecy of the trills at the heart

Bryce Morrison c 2018

What is a `romantic piano concerto'? The question opens a Pandora's box of enquiry, and, as Hyperion reaches the seventy-sixth volume in its tirelessly ongoing series, I am tempted to offer an answer. Seemingly strict and precise musical categories (classical, romantic, modern, etc) can be misleading, made more for convenience than accuracy. Classical music can contain romantic elements and vice versa. Again, if by `romantic piano concerto' you imply something narrow and prescriptive then you ignore a richl

More generally, the romantic piano concerto is associated with ear-tickling bravura and outsize technical demands. Listeners to the piano concertos of, say, Hummel and Scharwenka expected the musical equivalent of a trapeze act, of triple somersaults without a safety net, of demands that can only be met by the apparently supernaturally gifted. They were much less impressed by the romantic piano concertos of Brahms, where the massive and daunting keyboard parts seemed more opaque than glittering and which be

No accusations of frivolity could be levelled at the romantic piano concertos of Joseph Rheinberger (1839-1901) and Bernhard Scholz (1835-1916), both of which offer an intriguing mix of elements. There is a sense, too, in both concertos of a longing to break from classical restraint and past conventions. Both composers led successful if unadventurous lives reflected in music more substantial than entertaining. Nonetheless Rheinberger was a musical prodigy composing three-part Masses with organ accompaniment

The abrupt opening, a clarion call to attention, promises music on the grand scale, haunted by memories of Beethoven's `Emperor' concerto with the soloist quickly expanding his entry in a whirl of events with double notes for added fullness and texture. Yet there is never a suggestion of the sort of writing that so delighted the audiences of so-called musical jewels. The second subject provides a suitably lyrical contrast and later you hear the influence of Schumann, notably his love of dotted rhythms. Agai

As its title declares, the second movement `adagio patetico' is more inward looking, though large-scale gestures make a rapid return. An intriguing mix of styles, the writing is again more full-blooded than decorative, before the clouds thicken and mark a final return to the sombre and `patetico' mood of the opening.

The finale `allegro energico' opens with leaping octaves, again suggesting grand ambitions before an `adagio molto' and a brief oasis of calm amid much hyperactivity. A `poco meno mosso' section blossoms lyrically while the final pages return us to the concerto's opening grandeur and an impressive close. The ghosts of Beethoven and Schumann may haunt the pages of this most opulent concerto, written on the grandest scale, but if it lacks memorable thematic material, its neglect seems incomprehensible when yo

Bernhard Scholz belonged to a musical circle that included Joachim, Clara Schumann and, more particularly, Brahms, whose influence is strongly felt throughout his work. Indeed, Scholz worked assiduously to promote Brahms and, in common with that composer, his chamber music is among the highlights of his output. The present recording is a reminder that there should be more opportunities for a rediscovery of his work.

Many of the characteristics of the Rheinberger concerto apply here, though Scholz is not without his own distinctive personality. The genial opening of his concerto leads to figuration, much of it reminiscent of Mendelssohn's lighter touch. Yet despite the appearance of octaves, double notes and skittering passage-work-enough to outwardly satisfy the virtuoso fancier-there is, again, more substance than levity. The gestures are more weighty than light-hearted and a bleaker note in the very Schumannesque ope

Finally, as a makeweight or encore, the Capriccio for piano and orchestra, Op 35. The pianist's opening arpeggiated chords are close to Mendelssohn's Capriccio brillant, also for piano and orchestra, before an acceleration into liveliness and confirmation of the music's title. The bouncing principal idea-something to set heads nodding and feet tapping-offers much to delight and nothing to offend. With a fleeting octave figure suggesting a mock-oriental touch and a strange prophecy of the trills at the heart

Bryce Morrison c 2018

034571282251

Details

Format: CD
Label: HYP
Rel. Date: 06/29/2018
UPC: 034571282251

Romantic Piano Concerto 76
Artist: Simon Callaghan
Format: CD
New: In Stock $19.99
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Piano Concerto in a Flat Major Op 94[30'22]Joseph Rheinberger (1839-1901)
2. Moderato[13'33]
3. Adagio Patetico[6'32]
4. Finale: Allegro Energico[10'17]
5. Piano Concerto in B Major Op 57[28'49]Bernhard Scholz (1835-1916)
6. Allegro Moderato[11'55]
7. Andante, Quasi Adagio[8'44]
8. Allegro[8'10]
9. Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra Op 35[12'01]Bernhard Scholz (1835-1916)

More Info:

What is a `romantic piano concerto'? The question opens a Pandora's box of enquiry, and, as Hyperion reaches the seventy-sixth volume in its tirelessly ongoing series, I am tempted to offer an answer. Seemingly strict and precise musical categories (classical, romantic, modern, etc) can be misleading, made more for convenience than accuracy. Classical music can contain romantic elements and vice versa. Again, if by `romantic piano concerto' you imply something narrow and prescriptive then you ignore a richl

More generally, the romantic piano concerto is associated with ear-tickling bravura and outsize technical demands. Listeners to the piano concertos of, say, Hummel and Scharwenka expected the musical equivalent of a trapeze act, of triple somersaults without a safety net, of demands that can only be met by the apparently supernaturally gifted. They were much less impressed by the romantic piano concertos of Brahms, where the massive and daunting keyboard parts seemed more opaque than glittering and which be

No accusations of frivolity could be levelled at the romantic piano concertos of Joseph Rheinberger (1839-1901) and Bernhard Scholz (1835-1916), both of which offer an intriguing mix of elements. There is a sense, too, in both concertos of a longing to break from classical restraint and past conventions. Both composers led successful if unadventurous lives reflected in music more substantial than entertaining. Nonetheless Rheinberger was a musical prodigy composing three-part Masses with organ accompaniment

The abrupt opening, a clarion call to attention, promises music on the grand scale, haunted by memories of Beethoven's `Emperor' concerto with the soloist quickly expanding his entry in a whirl of events with double notes for added fullness and texture. Yet there is never a suggestion of the sort of writing that so delighted the audiences of so-called musical jewels. The second subject provides a suitably lyrical contrast and later you hear the influence of Schumann, notably his love of dotted rhythms. Agai

As its title declares, the second movement `adagio patetico' is more inward looking, though large-scale gestures make a rapid return. An intriguing mix of styles, the writing is again more full-blooded than decorative, before the clouds thicken and mark a final return to the sombre and `patetico' mood of the opening.

The finale `allegro energico' opens with leaping octaves, again suggesting grand ambitions before an `adagio molto' and a brief oasis of calm amid much hyperactivity. A `poco meno mosso' section blossoms lyrically while the final pages return us to the concerto's opening grandeur and an impressive close. The ghosts of Beethoven and Schumann may haunt the pages of this most opulent concerto, written on the grandest scale, but if it lacks memorable thematic material, its neglect seems incomprehensible when yo

Bernhard Scholz belonged to a musical circle that included Joachim, Clara Schumann and, more particularly, Brahms, whose influence is strongly felt throughout his work. Indeed, Scholz worked assiduously to promote Brahms and, in common with that composer, his chamber music is among the highlights of his output. The present recording is a reminder that there should be more opportunities for a rediscovery of his work.

Many of the characteristics of the Rheinberger concerto apply here, though Scholz is not without his own distinctive personality. The genial opening of his concerto leads to figuration, much of it reminiscent of Mendelssohn's lighter touch. Yet despite the appearance of octaves, double notes and skittering passage-work-enough to outwardly satisfy the virtuoso fancier-there is, again, more substance than levity. The gestures are more weighty than light-hearted and a bleaker note in the very Schumannesque ope

Finally, as a makeweight or encore, the Capriccio for piano and orchestra, Op 35. The pianist's opening arpeggiated chords are close to Mendelssohn's Capriccio brillant, also for piano and orchestra, before an acceleration into liveliness and confirmation of the music's title. The bouncing principal idea-something to set heads nodding and feet tapping-offers much to delight and nothing to offend. With a fleeting octave figure suggesting a mock-oriental touch and a strange prophecy of the trills at the heart

Bryce Morrison c 2018

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