Music Millennium

2016 three CD collection that features beloved arias from Bellini's "Norma;" Puccini's "La Bohéme," "Madame Butterfly" and "Gianno Schicchi;" Verdi's "La Traviata" and "Aida;" Bizet's "Carmen" and much more! Opera singers come and go, but just a few - the legends - live on. And Maria Callas was the great-est legend of them all, though not just for the wonder of her voice. She changed the way people thought about opera, but she also became famous as the glamorous celebrity who fell in love with Aristotle Onassis, leaving her elderly husband to live with him on his yacht Christina and enjoy the high life with the international jet set. Of course it ended badly. She lived her life like one of her own tragic heroines who (as women tend to do in opera) sing, suffer and die. And her own death came at just 53, after a dazzling but short career that took in heavy roles alongside decorative, nightingale-like ones - ignoring the established rules of vocal health and probably explaining why her voice finally gave out as it did. But in that time she did extraordinary things, using the muscle of those heavy heroines to em-power the nightingales with strength and depth of feeling nobody had thought to offer them be-fore. She gave them credibility as drama. Her performances were absolute and self-exposing: she held nothing back. And she was even tougher on herself than she could be on others - which is why her voice was never quite the flawless instrument singers are meant to cultivate. Her personality was far too volatile and too self-sacrificing in it's love affair with risk. In the mythology of opera, though, that's what the audience demands. We want the diva to be both a goddess and a slave: to give her life for art. We thrill to the dimension of that sacrifice. And Callas dutifully obliged.
2016 three CD collection that features beloved arias from Bellini's "Norma;" Puccini's "La Bohéme," "Madame Butterfly" and "Gianno Schicchi;" Verdi's "La Traviata" and "Aida;" Bizet's "Carmen" and much more! Opera singers come and go, but just a few - the legends - live on. And Maria Callas was the great-est legend of them all, though not just for the wonder of her voice. She changed the way people thought about opera, but she also became famous as the glamorous celebrity who fell in love with Aristotle Onassis, leaving her elderly husband to live with him on his yacht Christina and enjoy the high life with the international jet set. Of course it ended badly. She lived her life like one of her own tragic heroines who (as women tend to do in opera) sing, suffer and die. And her own death came at just 53, after a dazzling but short career that took in heavy roles alongside decorative, nightingale-like ones - ignoring the established rules of vocal health and probably explaining why her voice finally gave out as it did. But in that time she did extraordinary things, using the muscle of those heavy heroines to em-power the nightingales with strength and depth of feeling nobody had thought to offer them be-fore. She gave them credibility as drama. Her performances were absolute and self-exposing: she held nothing back. And she was even tougher on herself than she could be on others - which is why her voice was never quite the flawless instrument singers are meant to cultivate. Her personality was far too volatile and too self-sacrificing in it's love affair with risk. In the mythology of opera, though, that's what the audience demands. We want the diva to be both a goddess and a slave: to give her life for art. We thrill to the dimension of that sacrifice. And Callas dutifully obliged.
190295944711
Maria Callas - New Sounds of Maria Callas

Details

Format: CD
Label: WCL
Rel. Date: 11/04/2016
UPC: 190295944711

New Sounds of Maria Callas
Artist: Maria Callas
Format: CD
New: In Stock $19.98
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. 0Tullio Serafin "Norma, Act 1: "Casta Diva" (Norma, Chorus)"
2. 0Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "La Bohème, Act 1: "S?. Mi Chiamano Mim?" (Mimi)"
3. 0Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "La Bohème, Act 3: "Donde Lieta Usc?" (Mim?)"
4. 0Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "Suor Angelica, 'Sister Angelica': "Senza Mamma, O Bimbo" (Sister Angelica
5. 0Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "Gianni Schicchi, Act 1: "O Mio Babbino Caro" (Lauretta)"
6. 0Maria Callas, Orchestra Sinfonica Di Torino Della Rai, Gabriele Santini "La Traviata, Act 1: "E Strano! E Strano!" (Violetta)"
7. 0Maria Callas, Orchestra Sinfonica Di Torino Della Rai, Gabriele Santini "La Traviata, Act 1: "Ah Fors'e Lui" (Violetta)"
8. 0Maria Callas, Francesco Albanese, Orchestra Sinfonica Di Torino Della Rai, Gabriele Santini "La Traviata, Act 1: "Sempre Libera
9. 0Maria Callas, Orchestra Sinfonica Di Torino Della Rai, Gabriele Santini "La Traviata, Act 3: "Addio, Del Passato" (Violetta)" 1
10. Maria Callas, Orchestra Del Teatro Alla Scala Di Milano, Herbert Von Karajan "Il Trovatore, Act 4: "D'amor Sull'ali Rosee" (Leon
11. Georges Prêtre "Carmen, Act 1: "L'amour Est Un Oiseau Rebelle" (Carmen, Chorus) [Habanera]" 1
12. Maria Callas, Georges Prêtre, Orchestre de la Société Des Concerts Du Conservatoire "Werther, Act 3: "Werther! Qui M'aurait D
13. Maria Callas, Margreta Elkins, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "Lucia Di Lammermoor, Act 1: "Regnava Nel Silenzio Alta la
14. Maria Callas, Margreta Elkins, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "Lucia Di Lammermoor, Act 1: "Quando Rapito in Estasi" (Lu
15. Maria Callas, Orchestre de la Société Des Concerts Du Conservatoire, Nicola Rescigno "La Cenerentola, Act 2: "Nacqui All'affan
16. Tito Gobbi, Maria Callas, Luigi Alva, Philharmonia Orchestra, Alceo Galliera "Il Barbiere Di Siviglia, Act 1: "Una Voce Poco Fa"
17. Maria Callas, Orchestre de la Société Des Concerts Du Conservatoire, Georges Prêtre "Tosca, Act 2: "Vissi D'arte" (Tosca)" 1
18. 0Maria Callas, Orchestre de la Société Des Concerts Du Conservatoire, Georges Prêtre "Tosca, Act 3: "Com'è Lunga L'attesa!"
19. 0Manuel Spatafora, Nicola Zaccaria, Rolando Panerai, Giuseppe Di Stefano, Maria Callas, Orchestra Del Teatro Alla Scala D "La Bo
20. 0Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "Turandot, Act 1: "Signore, Ascolta!" (Turandot)" 2
21. 0Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "Turandot, Act 2: "In Questa Reggia" (Turandot)" 2
22. 0Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "Turandot, Act 3: "Tu, Che Di Gel Sei Cinta" (Turandot)" 2
23. 0Maria Callas, Orchestra Del Teatro Alla Scala Di Milano, Herbert Von Karajan "Madama Butterfly, Act 2: "Un Bel Di Vedremo" (But
24. 0Maria Callas, Orchestra Del Teatro Alla Scala Di Milano, Tullio Serafin "La Sonnambula, Act 1: "Compagne, Temiri Amici... Come
25. 0Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "Dinorah, '(Le) Pardon de Plo%Rmel', Act 2: "Ombre Légère" (Dinorah)" 2
26. Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "I Vespri Siciliani, Act 5: "Mercè, Dilette Amiche" Elena)" 2
27. Maria Callas, Nicola Rescigno, Orchestre de la Société Des Concerts Du Conservatoire "Aida, Act 1: "Ritorna Vincitor" (Aida)"
28. Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "Lakmé, Act 2: "O- Va la Jeune Indoue" (Lakmé)" 2
29. Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion FranÏAise/Georges Prêtre/Maria Callas "Louise, Act 3: "Depuis Le Jour O- Je Me Suis Do
30. Maria Callas, Georges Prêtre, Orchestre de la Société Des Concerts Du Conservatoire "Faust, Act 3: "Il Était Un Roi de Thul
31. Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "La Wally, Act 1: "Ebben?... Ne Andr Lontana" (Wally)" 3
32. 0Maria Callas, Renato Ercolani, Carlo Forti, William Dickie, Orchestra Del Teatro Alla Scala Di Milano, Tullio Serafin "Rigolett
33. 0Maria Callas, Orchestra Del Teatro Alla Scala Di Milano, Tullio Serafin "La Forza Del Destino, Act 2: "Sono Giunta! Grazie O Di
34. 0Maria Callas, Coro Del Teatro Alla Scala Di Milano, Orchestra Del Teatro Alla Scala Di Milano, Tullio Serafin "La Forza Del Des
35. 0Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Nicola Rescigno "MacBeth, Act 2: "La Luce Langue" (Lady MacBeth)" 3
36. 0Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "Adriana Lecouvreur, Act 1: "Ecco: Respiro Appena... Io Son L'umile Ancell
37. 0Maria Callas, Philharmonia Orchestra, Tullio Serafin "Adriana Lecouvreur, Act 4: "Poveri Fiori" (Adriana Lecouvreur)" 3
38. 0Tullio Serafin "Andrea Chénier, Act 3: "La Mamma Morta" (Maddalena)" 3
39. 0/Maria Callas, Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion FranÏAise, Georges Prêtre "Alceste, Act 1: "Divinités Du Styx" (Alces
40. Maria Callas, Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion FranÏAise, Georges Prêtre "Orphée Et Eurydice, Act 4: "J'ai Perdu Mon E
41. Maria Callas, Nicolai Gedda, Orchestre de L'opéra National de Paris, Georges Prêtre "Carmen, Act 1: "PRES Des Remparts de Sév
42. Maria Callas, Nadine Sautereau, Jane Berbié, Orchestre de L'opéra National de Paris, Georges Prêtre "Carmen, Act 2: "Les Trin
43. Maria Callas, Georges Prêtre, Orchestre de la Société Des Concerts Du Conservatoire "Manon, Act 2: "Je Ne Suis Que Faiblesse.
44. Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion FranÏAise, Georges Prêtre "Samson Et Dalila, Act 1: "Printemps Qui Commence" (Dalila)"
45. Georges Prêtre "Samson Et Dalila, Act 2: "Mon Coeur S'ouvre... Ta Voix" (Dalila)" 4
46. Maria Callas, Orchestre National de la Radiodiffusion FranÏAise, Georges Prêtre "Roméo Et Juliette, Act 1: "Je Veux Vivre" (W

More Info:

2016 three CD collection that features beloved arias from Bellini's "Norma;" Puccini's "La Bohéme," "Madame Butterfly" and "Gianno Schicchi;" Verdi's "La Traviata" and "Aida;" Bizet's "Carmen" and much more! Opera singers come and go, but just a few - the legends - live on. And Maria Callas was the great-est legend of them all, though not just for the wonder of her voice. She changed the way people thought about opera, but she also became famous as the glamorous celebrity who fell in love with Aristotle Onassis, leaving her elderly husband to live with him on his yacht Christina and enjoy the high life with the international jet set. Of course it ended badly. She lived her life like one of her own tragic heroines who (as women tend to do in opera) sing, suffer and die. And her own death came at just 53, after a dazzling but short career that took in heavy roles alongside decorative, nightingale-like ones - ignoring the established rules of vocal health and probably explaining why her voice finally gave out as it did. But in that time she did extraordinary things, using the muscle of those heavy heroines to em-power the nightingales with strength and depth of feeling nobody had thought to offer them be-fore. She gave them credibility as drama. Her performances were absolute and self-exposing: she held nothing back. And she was even tougher on herself than she could be on others - which is why her voice was never quite the flawless instrument singers are meant to cultivate. Her personality was far too volatile and too self-sacrificing in it's love affair with risk. In the mythology of opera, though, that's what the audience demands. We want the diva to be both a goddess and a slave: to give her life for art. We thrill to the dimension of that sacrifice. And Callas dutifully obliged.
        
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