Music Millennium

Why is the early 19th century still so vividly present in literature, philosophy, music and art? Why do Beethoven and Schubert continue to dominate many concert programmes as well as a considerable volume of contemporary music journalism? German Romanticism was never an arcane hideout for other-worldly escapists; rather, it has to this day remained one of the most popular wellsprings of activity and discussion. So how does Rahel Varnhagen fit into this? From 1790 to 1832, she hosted a famous salon in which she had discussions with and inspired eminent figures in the fields of literature, theatre, philosophy, music, politics and science. Her chains of somewhat unconventional correspondence span thousands of pages. Since Hannah Arendt's groundbreaking book on Rahel (1933/58), her historical significance as a "pariah", as an outsider who was constantly in the spotlight, as a woman of Jewish descent and as a (non-publishing) writer has been brought into ever-sharper focus. Pauline, the daughter of a banker by the name of Cesar, was from a very early age admired by many on account of her beauty. She soon went her own way, bore the child of a Russian officer and became the lover of Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia, who was also a composer and was later killed in battle, leading his men against the forces of Napoleon. So how can such an exchange of letters work as a stage production? Pauline writes in the way she presumably spoke, constantly switching between her Berlin dialect, a distinctive form of standard German and a highly adventurous Prussian French with her own spelling rules. Portrayed here by a concert singer, Pauline is allowed to be extravagant, whereas Rahel, who leans more towards straight theatre, is rather more rigid in her spoken and sung idiom. The scenes allow answers to be given straightaway even though the two protagonists do not actually meet until the epilogue. Born in 1943 in Bern (Switzerland), Roland Moser studied composition with Sandor Veress and has degrees in piano and music theory from Bern. In Germany he undertook further studies in Freiburg and Cologne. From 1969 to 1984 he taught theory and new music at the Winterthur Conservatorium. Until his retirement, he was subsequently professor of composing, orchestration and music theory at the City of Basel Music Academy. From 1968 onwards, he gained experience with experimental music in the Ensemble Neue Horizonte Bern, most of whose members also compose.
Why is the early 19th century still so vividly present in literature, philosophy, music and art? Why do Beethoven and Schubert continue to dominate many concert programmes as well as a considerable volume of contemporary music journalism? German Romanticism was never an arcane hideout for other-worldly escapists; rather, it has to this day remained one of the most popular wellsprings of activity and discussion. So how does Rahel Varnhagen fit into this? From 1790 to 1832, she hosted a famous salon in which she had discussions with and inspired eminent figures in the fields of literature, theatre, philosophy, music, politics and science. Her chains of somewhat unconventional correspondence span thousands of pages. Since Hannah Arendt's groundbreaking book on Rahel (1933/58), her historical significance as a "pariah", as an outsider who was constantly in the spotlight, as a woman of Jewish descent and as a (non-publishing) writer has been brought into ever-sharper focus. Pauline, the daughter of a banker by the name of Cesar, was from a very early age admired by many on account of her beauty. She soon went her own way, bore the child of a Russian officer and became the lover of Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia, who was also a composer and was later killed in battle, leading his men against the forces of Napoleon. So how can such an exchange of letters work as a stage production? Pauline writes in the way she presumably spoke, constantly switching between her Berlin dialect, a distinctive form of standard German and a highly adventurous Prussian French with her own spelling rules. Portrayed here by a concert singer, Pauline is allowed to be extravagant, whereas Rahel, who leans more towards straight theatre, is rather more rigid in her spoken and sung idiom. The scenes allow answers to be given straightaway even though the two protagonists do not actually meet until the epilogue. Born in 1943 in Bern (Switzerland), Roland Moser studied composition with Sandor Veress and has degrees in piano and music theory from Bern. In Germany he undertook further studies in Freiburg and Cologne. From 1969 to 1984 he taught theory and new music at the Winterthur Conservatorium. Until his retirement, he was subsequently professor of composing, orchestration and music theory at the City of Basel Music Academy. From 1968 onwards, he gained experience with experimental music in the Ensemble Neue Horizonte Bern, most of whose members also compose.
4260123644529
Moser / Meiser / Hirzel / Wursch - Rahel Und Pauline

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Format: CD
Label: SOLO MUSICA
Rel. Date: 05/10/2024
UPC: 4260123644529

Rahel Und Pauline
Artist: Moser / Meiser / Hirzel / Wursch
Format: CD
New: In Stock $21.00
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Why is the early 19th century still so vividly present in literature, philosophy, music and art? Why do Beethoven and Schubert continue to dominate many concert programmes as well as a considerable volume of contemporary music journalism? German Romanticism was never an arcane hideout for other-worldly escapists; rather, it has to this day remained one of the most popular wellsprings of activity and discussion. So how does Rahel Varnhagen fit into this? From 1790 to 1832, she hosted a famous salon in which she had discussions with and inspired eminent figures in the fields of literature, theatre, philosophy, music, politics and science. Her chains of somewhat unconventional correspondence span thousands of pages. Since Hannah Arendt's groundbreaking book on Rahel (1933/58), her historical significance as a "pariah", as an outsider who was constantly in the spotlight, as a woman of Jewish descent and as a (non-publishing) writer has been brought into ever-sharper focus. Pauline, the daughter of a banker by the name of Cesar, was from a very early age admired by many on account of her beauty. She soon went her own way, bore the child of a Russian officer and became the lover of Prince Louis Ferdinand of Prussia, who was also a composer and was later killed in battle, leading his men against the forces of Napoleon. So how can such an exchange of letters work as a stage production? Pauline writes in the way she presumably spoke, constantly switching between her Berlin dialect, a distinctive form of standard German and a highly adventurous Prussian French with her own spelling rules. Portrayed here by a concert singer, Pauline is allowed to be extravagant, whereas Rahel, who leans more towards straight theatre, is rather more rigid in her spoken and sung idiom. The scenes allow answers to be given straightaway even though the two protagonists do not actually meet until the epilogue. Born in 1943 in Bern (Switzerland), Roland Moser studied composition with Sandor Veress and has degrees in piano and music theory from Bern. In Germany he undertook further studies in Freiburg and Cologne. From 1969 to 1984 he taught theory and new music at the Winterthur Conservatorium. Until his retirement, he was subsequently professor of composing, orchestration and music theory at the City of Basel Music Academy. From 1968 onwards, he gained experience with experimental music in the Ensemble Neue Horizonte Bern, most of whose members also compose.
        
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