Second volume of 'I'd Love to Turn You On', a series which explores the relationship between '60s pop and classical music, free jazz and the avant-garde; providing many examples of how popular music evolved, matured and became liberated under the influence of apparently deeper, more expansive genres. While preparing 'Rubber Soul', 'Revolver' and 'Sgt Pepper' - major artistic achievements that would change popular music forever - The Beatles drew on a wide range of eclectic influences; from the outer limits of jazz (John Coltrane, Ornette Colenan, Sun Ra, Albert Ayler) and from the audacious sound experiments of modernist composers including John Cage, who believed all sound to be music and Pierre Schaeffer who pioneered musique concrète. Looking to strike a balance, George Martin contributed a more formal classical understanding which proved essential in creating such productions as 'Yesterday' and 'Eleanor Rigby'. Literary enthusiasms also played a part - with Lewis Carroll a less than distant echo on 'Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds' and 'I Am The Walrus' - as did a certain playful irreverence derived from the anarchic humour of The Goons. With psychedelia in it's infancy and with everything possible, many other popular artists, brought up on blues or beat felt encouraged to embrace music from further afield. In 1965, live performances of David Bowie's group, The Lower Third, came to a screaming conclusion with a feedback-laden interpretation of 'Mars' from 'The Planets'. The fantasy quality of Syd Barrett's songwriting for Pink Floyd's debut 'Piper At The Gates Of Dawn', drew on the nonsense verse of Hilaire Belloc. Pete Townshend was introduced to the music of the 17th century English composer Henry Purcell by his manager Kit Lambert. The 'Gordian Knot Untied' uses a series of suspended chords. The sadness and sophistication of the chord suspensions made a strong impression on Townshend and he began incorporating the idea into his work, with the intro to 'Pinball Wizard' being the classic example. In America, Frank Zappa and the Mothers Of Invention's revolutionary debut, 'Freak Out!', connected modernist composition to pop citing Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Boulez and Varèse under the heading "These People Have Contributed Materially in Many Ways to Make Our Music What it is". The album was both without precedent and of great influence. Not for nothing did Paul McCartney reportedly call 'Sgt Pepper' "our 'Freak Out!'. "
Second volume of 'I'd Love to Turn You On', a series which explores the relationship between '60s pop and classical music, free jazz and the avant-garde; providing many examples of how popular music evolved, matured and became liberated under the influence of apparently deeper, more expansive genres. While preparing 'Rubber Soul', 'Revolver' and 'Sgt Pepper' - major artistic achievements that would change popular music forever - The Beatles drew on a wide range of eclectic influences; from the outer limits of jazz (John Coltrane, Ornette Colenan, Sun Ra, Albert Ayler) and from the audacious sound experiments of modernist composers including John Cage, who believed all sound to be music and Pierre Schaeffer who pioneered musique concrète. Looking to strike a balance, George Martin contributed a more formal classical understanding which proved essential in creating such productions as 'Yesterday' and 'Eleanor Rigby'. Literary enthusiasms also played a part - with Lewis Carroll a less than distant echo on 'Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds' and 'I Am The Walrus' - as did a certain playful irreverence derived from the anarchic humour of The Goons. With psychedelia in it's infancy and with everything possible, many other popular artists, brought up on blues or beat felt encouraged to embrace music from further afield. In 1965, live performances of David Bowie's group, The Lower Third, came to a screaming conclusion with a feedback-laden interpretation of 'Mars' from 'The Planets'. The fantasy quality of Syd Barrett's songwriting for Pink Floyd's debut 'Piper At The Gates Of Dawn', drew on the nonsense verse of Hilaire Belloc. Pete Townshend was introduced to the music of the 17th century English composer Henry Purcell by his manager Kit Lambert. The 'Gordian Knot Untied' uses a series of suspended chords. The sadness and sophistication of the chord suspensions made a strong impression on Townshend and he began incorporating the idea into his work, with the intro to 'Pinball Wizard' being the classic example. In America, Frank Zappa and the Mothers Of Invention's revolutionary debut, 'Freak Out!', connected modernist composition to pop citing Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Boulez and Varèse under the heading "These People Have Contributed Materially in Many Ways to Make Our Music What it is". The album was both without precedent and of great influence. Not for nothing did Paul McCartney reportedly call 'Sgt Pepper' "our 'Freak Out!'. "
5013929335936

Details

Format: CD
Label: EL RECORDS
Rel. Date: 11/05/2021
UPC: 5013929335936

I'd Love To Turn You On Vol 2 / Various (Uk)
Artist: I'd Love To Turn You On Vol 2 / Various
Format: CD
New: In Stock $36.99
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Available Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Mars, the Bringer of War (Allegro), from the Planets, Op. 32
2. To Begin at the Beginning, from Under Milk Wood - a Play for Voices
3. Greensleeves
4. Time on Our Hands (Titles and City Music)
5. Spirits
6. The Picture of Dorian Gray - Scene One
7. Aria with Fontana Mix
8. Ensemble Introduction to Charlie Haden / Charlie Haden - Bass Solo
9. Ensemble Introduction to Scott Lafaro / Scott Lafaro - Bass Solo
10. Advice to Medics
11. The Raven
12. Objets Étendus from Étude Aux Objets (Study of Objects)
13. Tweedledum and Tweedledee from Alice Through the Looking Glass
14. Variations Sur Une Flûte Mexicaine (Excerpt)
15. I'm Walking Backwards for Christmas
16. Malaguena
17. Take Five
18. Ragtime for Eleven Instruments
19. Frühling (Spring)
20. September
21. Beim Schlafengehen (When Falling Asleep)
22. Im Abendrot (At Sunset)
23. Aubade
24. The Wagon Passes
25. Overture
26. Air (Moderato)
27. Rondeau Minuet
28. Air (Allegro)
29. Jig
30. Chaconne
31. Air (Allegro)
32. Minuet
33. La Cathédrale Engloutie (The Sunken Cathedral)
34. My Robin Is to the Greenwood Gone
35. Vetcheryai Rado (Come to Supper Tonight, Rada)
36. Polegnala E Todora (Theodora Is Dozing)
37. Fantasia on a Theme By Thomas Tallis
38. Marche Du Soldat - Airs de Marche
39. Premier Tableau: Airs By a Stream
40. Deuxième Tableau: Pastorale
41. Marche Royale
42. Petit Concert
43. Trois Danses: Tango, Valse, Ragtime
44. Danse Du Diable
45. Grand Choral
46. Marche Triomphale Du Diable
47. Vorgefühle (Premonitions)
48. Vergangenes (The Past)
49. Sommermorgen An Einem See (Summer Morning By a Lake: Chord-Colours)
50. Peripetie (Peripeteia)
51. Das Obligate Rezitativ (The Obbligato Recitative)
52. Turkey: Automobile on Mountain Road - Central Anatolian Dance
53. Iran: Rhythm of a Train
54. India: Raga Zila from Varanasi
55. India: Temple Bells and Drums of a Bengali Kali Temple
56. Allegretto Pizzicato
57. San Francisco Scene (The Beat Generation)
58. Bronce Gitano (Solaeres)
59. Bolero
60. Osanna in Excelsis from Sanctus from Mass in D Minor
61. Symphony No.5 in E Flat, Op.82
62. First Movement: Tempo Molto Moderato - Largamente - Allegro Moderato - Presto
63. Introduction By Yehudi Menuhin
64. Rag Sindhi Bhairavi
65. Matilda, from Four Cautionary Tales
66. Jet Song from "West Side Story"
67. Symphony No.9 in D Major : First Movement: Andante Comodo
68. You're the Top

More Info:

Second volume of 'I'd Love to Turn You On', a series which explores the relationship between '60s pop and classical music, free jazz and the avant-garde; providing many examples of how popular music evolved, matured and became liberated under the influence of apparently deeper, more expansive genres. While preparing 'Rubber Soul', 'Revolver' and 'Sgt Pepper' - major artistic achievements that would change popular music forever - The Beatles drew on a wide range of eclectic influences; from the outer limits of jazz (John Coltrane, Ornette Colenan, Sun Ra, Albert Ayler) and from the audacious sound experiments of modernist composers including John Cage, who believed all sound to be music and Pierre Schaeffer who pioneered musique concrète. Looking to strike a balance, George Martin contributed a more formal classical understanding which proved essential in creating such productions as 'Yesterday' and 'Eleanor Rigby'. Literary enthusiasms also played a part - with Lewis Carroll a less than distant echo on 'Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds' and 'I Am The Walrus' - as did a certain playful irreverence derived from the anarchic humour of The Goons. With psychedelia in it's infancy and with everything possible, many other popular artists, brought up on blues or beat felt encouraged to embrace music from further afield. In 1965, live performances of David Bowie's group, The Lower Third, came to a screaming conclusion with a feedback-laden interpretation of 'Mars' from 'The Planets'. The fantasy quality of Syd Barrett's songwriting for Pink Floyd's debut 'Piper At The Gates Of Dawn', drew on the nonsense verse of Hilaire Belloc. Pete Townshend was introduced to the music of the 17th century English composer Henry Purcell by his manager Kit Lambert. The 'Gordian Knot Untied' uses a series of suspended chords. The sadness and sophistication of the chord suspensions made a strong impression on Townshend and he began incorporating the idea into his work, with the intro to 'Pinball Wizard' being the classic example. In America, Frank Zappa and the Mothers Of Invention's revolutionary debut, 'Freak Out!', connected modernist composition to pop citing Stravinsky, Schoenberg, Boulez and Varèse under the heading "These People Have Contributed Materially in Many Ways to Make Our Music What it is". The album was both without precedent and of great influence. Not for nothing did Paul McCartney reportedly call 'Sgt Pepper' "our 'Freak Out!'. "