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Brahms, Johannes: Variations and Fugue on a theme by Handel op. 24 Reger, Max: Variations and Fugue on a theme by J.S. Bach op. 81A multigenerational project of a special kind: Friedrich Wilhelm Schnurr goes back far enough to have studied with the piano legends Alfred Cortot and Wilhelm Kempff. As a dedicated teacher of world rank, he himself has continued to leave his mark on generations of pianists through to the present. Many of his outstanding pupils have gone on to occupy prestigious professorships throughout the world. MDG is now rereleasing a recording from the 1980s showing us Schnurr as an energetic, gripping interpreter. Variations on themes by Handel and Bach form his musical topic: Johannes Brahms and Max Reger also knew what sort of predecessors they had!Handel himself based a variation movement on his dancy and simple theme. What the young Brahms did with it, however, is sensational. Although he adheres very closely to the original in formal matters, a gigantic cosmos of musical characters and expressive levels unfolds. It is fascinating how Schnurr develops this most highly compressed and concentrated music through to the mighty concluding fugue.Max Reger chose an instrumental prelude from a Bach cantata as the pretext for his variation cycle. Unlike Brahms, however, after a few paraphrases he strayed far from his point of departure. Already the third variation is a very free, contemplative fantasy surprising us with it's sudden dynamic outbursts. Reger too concludes with an extraordinary fugue. Already the initial subject is brimming with chromaticism, and when the second subject enters later on, the result is a double fugue of colossal dimensions.
Brahms, Johannes: Variations and Fugue on a theme by Handel op. 24 Reger, Max: Variations and Fugue on a theme by J.S. Bach op. 81A multigenerational project of a special kind: Friedrich Wilhelm Schnurr goes back far enough to have studied with the piano legends Alfred Cortot and Wilhelm Kempff. As a dedicated teacher of world rank, he himself has continued to leave his mark on generations of pianists through to the present. Many of his outstanding pupils have gone on to occupy prestigious professorships throughout the world. MDG is now rereleasing a recording from the 1980s showing us Schnurr as an energetic, gripping interpreter. Variations on themes by Handel and Bach form his musical topic: Johannes Brahms and Max Reger also knew what sort of predecessors they had!Handel himself based a variation movement on his dancy and simple theme. What the young Brahms did with it, however, is sensational. Although he adheres very closely to the original in formal matters, a gigantic cosmos of musical characters and expressive levels unfolds. It is fascinating how Schnurr develops this most highly compressed and concentrated music through to the mighty concluding fugue.Max Reger chose an instrumental prelude from a Bach cantata as the pretext for his variation cycle. Unlike Brahms, however, after a few paraphrases he strayed far from his point of departure. Already the third variation is a very free, contemplative fantasy surprising us with it's sudden dynamic outbursts. Reger too concludes with an extraordinary fugue. Already the initial subject is brimming with chromaticism, and when the second subject enters later on, the result is a double fugue of colossal dimensions.
760623017228
Brahms / Reger / Friedrich Schnurr Wilhelm - Variations & Fugues on Themes By Handel & Bach

Details

Format: CD
Label: MDGE
Rel. Date: 05/26/2015
UPC: 760623017228

Variations & Fugues on Themes By Handel & Bach
Artist: Brahms / Reger / Friedrich Schnurr Wilhelm
Format: CD
New: In Stock $20.99
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Arie
2. Variation 1: Più Vivo
3. Variation 2
4. Variation 3
5. Variation 4
6. Variation 5
7. Variation 6
8. Variation 7
9. Variation 8 1
10. Variation 9: Poco Sostenuto 1
11. Variation 10: Allegro 1
12. Variation 11: Moderato 1
13. Variation 12: L'istesso Tempo 1
14. Variation 13: Largamente, Ma Non Troppo 1
15. Variation 14 1
16. Variation 15 1
17. Variation 16 1
18. Variation 17 1
19. Variation 18 2
20. Variation 19 2
21. Variation 20: Andante 2
22. Variation 21: Vivace 2
23. Variation 22: Alla Musette 2
24. Variation 23: Vivace 2
25. Variation 24 2
26. Variation 25 2
27. Fuge 2
28. NR. 1 Andante (Quasi Adagio) 2
29. NR. 2 L'istesso Tempo 3
30. NR. 3 Sempre Espressivo Ed Quasi Legato 3
31. NR. 4 Grave Assai 3
32. NR. 5 Vivace 3
33. NR. 6 Vivace 3
34. NR. 7 Allegro Moderato 3
35. NR. 8 Adagio 3
36. NR. 9 Vivace 3
37. NR. 10 Grave E Sempre Molto Espressivo 3
38. NR. 11 Poco Vivace 3
39. NR. 12 Allegro Agitato 4
40. NR. 13 Andante Sostenuto 4
41. NR. 14 Vivace 4
42. NR. 15 Con Moto 4
43. NR. 16 Fuga: Sostenuto - Più Moto

More Info:

Brahms, Johannes: Variations and Fugue on a theme by Handel op. 24 Reger, Max: Variations and Fugue on a theme by J.S. Bach op. 81A multigenerational project of a special kind: Friedrich Wilhelm Schnurr goes back far enough to have studied with the piano legends Alfred Cortot and Wilhelm Kempff. As a dedicated teacher of world rank, he himself has continued to leave his mark on generations of pianists through to the present. Many of his outstanding pupils have gone on to occupy prestigious professorships throughout the world. MDG is now rereleasing a recording from the 1980s showing us Schnurr as an energetic, gripping interpreter. Variations on themes by Handel and Bach form his musical topic: Johannes Brahms and Max Reger also knew what sort of predecessors they had!Handel himself based a variation movement on his dancy and simple theme. What the young Brahms did with it, however, is sensational. Although he adheres very closely to the original in formal matters, a gigantic cosmos of musical characters and expressive levels unfolds. It is fascinating how Schnurr develops this most highly compressed and concentrated music through to the mighty concluding fugue.Max Reger chose an instrumental prelude from a Bach cantata as the pretext for his variation cycle. Unlike Brahms, however, after a few paraphrases he strayed far from his point of departure. Already the third variation is a very free, contemplative fantasy surprising us with it's sudden dynamic outbursts. Reger too concludes with an extraordinary fugue. Already the initial subject is brimming with chromaticism, and when the second subject enters later on, the result is a double fugue of colossal dimensions.
        
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