Music Millennium

If you've encountered Volumes 1, 2 and 3 you'll know that Fats started life running and rarely slowed down. Born in New York in 1904, he showed early signs of the gifts that would sustain him throughout his career - musical skill and unlimited charm. Aged sixteen, he attached himself to the circle of James P Johnson, a leading stride pianist - and traces of the stride style would feature in virtually all Fats' work. He first recorded in 1922. For a time he was used as an accompanist for recording sessions before, in 1926, recording under his own name. From then until his death he was a star whose output and series of hits was unmatched. In 1929, Fats recorded what is generally accepted as the first jazz recording with a band composed of black and white musicians. Routine now, it was revolutionary then. By the time of the opening tracks here, Fats had married Edith, separated (she was in eternal pursuit of him for alimony) and had set up a new household with the more tolerant Anita. He was a leading recording star, appeared frequently on radio and was almost continually taking a show on tour. He had also appeared to good effect in a couple of Hollywood movies. His records sold in North America and throughout the free world. By September 1936, the personnel of Fats' band had settled onto the musicians listed in the discography. There would be few changes from now on. 1936 was spent mainly on the road. Fats was under financial pressure from the IRS and his ex-wife, Edith - it would be difficult to calculate who was the more formidable. In addition, his recording company was constantly pressing for more sessions. If this sounds like a treadmill, it was - justified by the fact that Fats was almost infallible in the recording studio - his bonhomie, invention and virtuosity rarely deserting him.
If you've encountered Volumes 1, 2 and 3 you'll know that Fats started life running and rarely slowed down. Born in New York in 1904, he showed early signs of the gifts that would sustain him throughout his career - musical skill and unlimited charm. Aged sixteen, he attached himself to the circle of James P Johnson, a leading stride pianist - and traces of the stride style would feature in virtually all Fats' work. He first recorded in 1922. For a time he was used as an accompanist for recording sessions before, in 1926, recording under his own name. From then until his death he was a star whose output and series of hits was unmatched. In 1929, Fats recorded what is generally accepted as the first jazz recording with a band composed of black and white musicians. Routine now, it was revolutionary then. By the time of the opening tracks here, Fats had married Edith, separated (she was in eternal pursuit of him for alimony) and had set up a new household with the more tolerant Anita. He was a leading recording star, appeared frequently on radio and was almost continually taking a show on tour. He had also appeared to good effect in a couple of Hollywood movies. His records sold in North America and throughout the free world. By September 1936, the personnel of Fats' band had settled onto the musicians listed in the discography. There would be few changes from now on. 1936 was spent mainly on the road. Fats was under financial pressure from the IRS and his ex-wife, Edith - it would be difficult to calculate who was the more formidable. In addition, his recording company was constantly pressing for more sessions. If this sounds like a treadmill, it was - justified by the fact that Fats was almost infallible in the recording studio - his bonhomie, invention and virtuosity rarely deserting him.
788065904821
Fats Waller - Vol. 4 Of The Complete Recorded Works-1936-38

Details

Format: CD
Label: JSP
Catalog: 948
Rel. Date: 02/19/2008
UPC: 788065904821

Vol. 4 Of The Complete Recorded Works-1936-38
Artist: Fats Waller
Format: CD
New: In Stock $28.99
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. S'posin'
2. Copper Colored Gal
3. I'm at the Mercy of Love
4. Floatin' Down to Cotton Town
5. La-De-De, La-De-Da
6. Hallelujah! Things Look Rosy Now
7. Hallelujah! Things Look Rosy Now - (instrumental)
8. 'Tain't Good (Like a Nickel Made of Wood)
9. 'Tain't Good (Like a Nickel Made of Wood) - (instrumental)
10. Swingin' Them Jingle Bells
11. Swingin' Them Jingle Bells - (instrumental)
12. Thousand Dreams of You, A
13. Thousand Dreams of You, A - (instrumental)
14. Rhyme for Love, A
15. I Adore You
16. Havin' a Ball
17. I'm Sorry I Made You Cry
18. Who's Afraid of Love?
19. Please Keep Me in Your Dreams
20. One in a Million
21. Nero
22. You're Laughing at Me
23. I Can't Break the Habit of You
24. Did Anyone Ever Tell You?
25. When Love Is Young
26. Meanest Thing You Ever Did Was Kiss Me, The
27. Cryin' Mood
28. Where Is the Sun?

DISC: 2

1. You've Been Reading My Mail
2. To a Sweet Pretty Thing
3. Old Plantation
4. Spring Cleaning
5. Honeysuckle Rose
6. Blues
7. You Showed Me the Way
8. You Showed Me the Way - (instrumental)
9. Boo-Hoo
10. Love Bug Will Bite You, The
11. San Anton'
12. San Anton' - (instrumental)
13. I've Got a New Lease on Love
14. I've Got a New Lease on Love - (instrumental)
15. Sweet Heartache
16. Sweet Heartache - (instrumental)
17. Honeysuckle Rose
18. (You Know It All) Smarty
19. Don't You Know or Don't You Care?
20. Lost Love
21. I'm Gonna Put You in Your Place
22. Blue Turning Grey Over You
23. Keepin' Out of Mischief Now
24. Stardust
25. Basin Street Blues
26. Tea for Two

DISC: 3

1. I Ain't Got Nobody
2. You've Got Me Under Your Thumb
3. Beat It Out
4. Our Love Was Meant to Be
5. I'd Rather Call You Baby
6. I'm Always in the Mood for You
7. She's Tall, She's Tan, She's Terrific
8. You're My Dish
9. More Power to You
10. How Can I?
11. Joint Is Jumpin', The
12. Hopeless Love Affair, A
13. What Will I Do in the Morning?
14. How Ya Baby?
15. Jealous of Me
16. On the Sunny Side of the Street
17. Georgia
18. Every Day's a Holiday
19. Neglected
20. My Window Faces the South
21. Am I in Another World?
22. Why Do Hawaiians Sing Aloha?
23. My First Impression of You

DISC: 4

1. Something Tells Me
2. I Love to Whistle
3. You Went to My Head
4. Florida Flo
5. Lost and Found
6. Don't Try to Cry Your Way Back to Me
7. Marie
8. In the Gloaming
9. You Had an Evening to Spare
10. Let's Break the Good News
11. 'Skrontch'
12. I Simply Adore You
13. Sheik of Araby, The
14. Hold My Hand
15. Inside (This Heart of Mine)
16. Big Business, Pt. 1
17. Big Business, Pt. 2
18. Did Anyone Ever Tell You? - (alternate take)
19. More Power to You - (alternate take)
20. Every Day's a Holiday - (alternate take)
21. In the Gloaming - (alternate take)
22. I Simply Adore You - (alternate take)
23. Sheik of Araby, The - (alternate take)
24. Hold My Hand - (alternate take)
25. Inside (This Heart of Mine) - (alternate take)

More Info:

If you've encountered Volumes 1, 2 and 3 you'll know that Fats started life running and rarely slowed down. Born in New York in 1904, he showed early signs of the gifts that would sustain him throughout his career - musical skill and unlimited charm. Aged sixteen, he attached himself to the circle of James P Johnson, a leading stride pianist - and traces of the stride style would feature in virtually all Fats' work. He first recorded in 1922. For a time he was used as an accompanist for recording sessions before, in 1926, recording under his own name. From then until his death he was a star whose output and series of hits was unmatched. In 1929, Fats recorded what is generally accepted as the first jazz recording with a band composed of black and white musicians. Routine now, it was revolutionary then. By the time of the opening tracks here, Fats had married Edith, separated (she was in eternal pursuit of him for alimony) and had set up a new household with the more tolerant Anita. He was a leading recording star, appeared frequently on radio and was almost continually taking a show on tour. He had also appeared to good effect in a couple of Hollywood movies. His records sold in North America and throughout the free world. By September 1936, the personnel of Fats' band had settled onto the musicians listed in the discography. There would be few changes from now on. 1936 was spent mainly on the road. Fats was under financial pressure from the IRS and his ex-wife, Edith - it would be difficult to calculate who was the more formidable. In addition, his recording company was constantly pressing for more sessions. If this sounds like a treadmill, it was - justified by the fact that Fats was almost infallible in the recording studio - his bonhomie, invention and virtuosity rarely deserting him.
        
back to top