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After the great success that Il Trovatore received in Paris, Verdi was proposed to compose a French version of the opera to suit the tastes of the local public. The original work, based on the Spanish play El trovador by Antonio García Gutiérrez, had a libretto by Cammarano, which was translated into French by Émilien Pacini. Le Trouvère was first staged in Brussels in 1856 and premiered at the Paris Opera in 1857. In this new version the composer added some music in act 3 for the gypsie ballet scene, extended the finale of act 4 and made several other revisions. The plot is highly dramatic and captivating: Verdi portrays strong characters who deal with war, obsession and revenge. To use director Robert Wilson's words "this is a family tragedy, and in many ways, it is a very contemporary story." Wilson's approach to the opera aims at preserving it's emotional strength by using a very essential décor, whose main element is light: "As a director, when I design the stage and lighting, I think about if what I see can help me hear better. Le Trouvère requires a tremendous amount of concentration, so the set I designed is abstract in order to create a space for the music in the Farnese. I have designed an environment in concrete, creating a juxtaposition to the theatre's ornate interior. [...] Light in my work functions as part of the architectural whole. It is an element which helps us hear and see. Without light there is no space. To light a world that Verdi has described as so dark, one needs light to make the space darker." In the set's background the director also uses some photos by American photographer Robert Rosenkranz. This production was staged in the splendid Teatro Farnese of Parma, which was built in 1628 and belongs to the Complesso Monumentale della Pilotta, one of the oldest museums in Italy. Extra content: Interview with the curator of the Museum subtitled in all languages.
After the great success that Il Trovatore received in Paris, Verdi was proposed to compose a French version of the opera to suit the tastes of the local public. The original work, based on the Spanish play El trovador by Antonio García Gutiérrez, had a libretto by Cammarano, which was translated into French by Émilien Pacini. Le Trouvère was first staged in Brussels in 1856 and premiered at the Paris Opera in 1857. In this new version the composer added some music in act 3 for the gypsie ballet scene, extended the finale of act 4 and made several other revisions. The plot is highly dramatic and captivating: Verdi portrays strong characters who deal with war, obsession and revenge. To use director Robert Wilson's words "this is a family tragedy, and in many ways, it is a very contemporary story." Wilson's approach to the opera aims at preserving it's emotional strength by using a very essential décor, whose main element is light: "As a director, when I design the stage and lighting, I think about if what I see can help me hear better. Le Trouvère requires a tremendous amount of concentration, so the set I designed is abstract in order to create a space for the music in the Farnese. I have designed an environment in concrete, creating a juxtaposition to the theatre's ornate interior. [...] Light in my work functions as part of the architectural whole. It is an element which helps us hear and see. Without light there is no space. To light a world that Verdi has described as so dark, one needs light to make the space darker." In the set's background the director also uses some photos by American photographer Robert Rosenkranz. This production was staged in the splendid Teatro Farnese of Parma, which was built in 1628 and belongs to the Complesso Monumentale della Pilotta, one of the oldest museums in Italy. Extra content: Interview with the curator of the Museum subtitled in all languages.
8007144078355
Giuseppe Gipali - Trouvere

Details

Format: CD
Label: DNMC
Rel. Date: 09/27/2019
UPC: 8007144078355

Trouvere
Artist: Giuseppe Gipali
Format: CD
New: In Stock $24.99
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Formats and Editions

DISC: 1
MP3
1. Le Trouvère, Act I Scene 1 (Sung In French): Alerte ! Qu'on Veille [Live]
2. Le Trouvère, Act I Scene 1 (Sung In French): De Mon Maître Le Père Avait Deux Fils [Live]
3. Le Trouvère, Act I Scene 2 (Sung In French): Qui Vous Arrête ? [Live]
4. Le Trouvère, Act I Scene 2 (Sung In French): La Nuit Calme Et Sereine [Live]
5. Le Trouvère, Act I Scene 2 (Sung In French): L'amour Ardent, L'amour Sublime Et Tendre [Live]
6. Le Trouvère, Act I Scene 3 (Sung In French): La Nuit Est Calme [Live]
7. Le Trouvère, Act I Scene 3 (Sung In French): Exilé Sur La Terre [Live]
8. Le Trouvère, Act I Scene 4 (Sung In French): Perfide ! [Live]
9. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 1 (Sung In French): Le Jour Renaît [Live]
10. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 1 (Sung In French): La Flamme Brille [Live]
11. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 1 (Sung In French): Que Ta Chanson Est Triste [Live]
12. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 2 (Sung In French): Nous Voilà Seuls [Live]
13. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 2 (Sung In French): C'est Là Qu'ils L'ont Traînée [Live]
14. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 2 (Sung In French): Je Ne Suis Pas Ton Fils ! [Live]
15. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 2 (Sung In French): Au Milieu De La Carrière [Live]
16. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 2 (Sung In French): Un Messager Vers Nous S'avance [Live]
17. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 3 (Sung In French): Ô Mon Fils ! Toi Que J'adore [Live]
18. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 4 (Sung In French): Tout Est Désert, Et L'hymne Accoutumée [Live]
19. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 4 (Sung In French) Son Regard, Son Doux Sourire [Live]
20. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 4 (Sung In French): Qu'entends-Je ! Ô Ciel ! [Live]
21. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 4 (Sung In French): Cruelle Impatience ! [Live]
22. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 4 (Sung In French): L'exil Est Sur La Terre [Live]
23. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 5 (Sung In French): Pourquoi Pleurer ? [Live]
24. Le Trouvère, Act II Scene 7 (Sung In French): Ô Ciel ! Manrique ! [Live]
25. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 1 (Sung In French): Les Dés Ont Pour Nous Des Charmes [Live]
26. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 2 (Sung In French): Pas De Bohémiens [Live]
27. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 2 (Sung In French): Gitanilla [Live]
DISC: 2
MP3
1. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 2 (Sung In French): Ensemble [Live]
2. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 2 (Sung In French): Sevillana [Live]
3. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 2 (Sung In French): La Bohémienne [Live]
4. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 2 (Sung In French): Galop [Live]
5. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 3 (Sung In French): Dans Les Bras D'un Rival ! [Live]
6. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 5 (Sung In French): Je Vivais Pauvre Et Sans Peine [Live]
7. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 6 (Sung In French): Quels Sont Ces Cris Lointains ? [Live]
8. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 6 (Sung In French): Ô Toi ! Mon Seul Espoir [Live]
9. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 6 (Sung In French): Entends Ces Chants Religieux [Live]
10. Le Trouvère, Act III Scene 6 (Sung In French): Supplice Infâme Qui La Réclame ! [Live]
11. Le Trouvère, Act IV Scene 1 (Sung In French): C'est Là ! [Live]
12. Le Trouvère, Act IV Scene 1 (Sung In French): Brise D'amour Fidèle [Live]
13. Le Trouvère, Act IV Scene 1 (Sung In French): Miserere ! Pitié Pour Notre Frère [Live]
14. Le Trouvère, Act IV Scene 2 (Sung In French): C'est L'ordre, Que Le Fils Soit Puni Par La Hache [Live]
15. Le Trouvère, Act IV Scene 2 (Sung In French): Grâce ! Contemple Mes Douleurs ! [Live]
16. Le Trouvère, Act IV Scene 2 (Sung In French): Il Vivra ! Sauvé ! Sauvé ! [Live]
17. Le Trouvère, Act IV Scene 3 (Sung In French): Mère ! Tu Dors ! [Live]
18. Le Trouvère, Act IV Scene 3 (Sung In French): Oui, La Fatigue À La Fin M'excède [Live]
19. Le Trouvère, Act IV Scene 4 (Sung In French): Quoi ! Qu'ai-Je Vu ! [Live]
20. Le Trouvère, Act IV Scene 4 (Sung In French): Arrière ! [Live]
21. Le Trouvère, Act IV Scene 5 (Sung In French): Plutôt Que Vivre Et Te Trahir [Live]

More Info:

After the great success that Il Trovatore received in Paris, Verdi was proposed to compose a French version of the opera to suit the tastes of the local public. The original work, based on the Spanish play El trovador by Antonio García Gutiérrez, had a libretto by Cammarano, which was translated into French by Émilien Pacini. Le Trouvère was first staged in Brussels in 1856 and premiered at the Paris Opera in 1857. In this new version the composer added some music in act 3 for the gypsie ballet scene, extended the finale of act 4 and made several other revisions. The plot is highly dramatic and captivating: Verdi portrays strong characters who deal with war, obsession and revenge. To use director Robert Wilson's words "this is a family tragedy, and in many ways, it is a very contemporary story." Wilson's approach to the opera aims at preserving it's emotional strength by using a very essential décor, whose main element is light: "As a director, when I design the stage and lighting, I think about if what I see can help me hear better. Le Trouvère requires a tremendous amount of concentration, so the set I designed is abstract in order to create a space for the music in the Farnese. I have designed an environment in concrete, creating a juxtaposition to the theatre's ornate interior. [...] Light in my work functions as part of the architectural whole. It is an element which helps us hear and see. Without light there is no space. To light a world that Verdi has described as so dark, one needs light to make the space darker." In the set's background the director also uses some photos by American photographer Robert Rosenkranz. This production was staged in the splendid Teatro Farnese of Parma, which was built in 1628 and belongs to the Complesso Monumentale della Pilotta, one of the oldest museums in Italy. Extra content: Interview with the curator of the Museum subtitled in all languages.
        
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